Norton Cancer Institute Sexual Health Program

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It is normal to experience many different emotions before, during and after cancer diagnosis and treatment, especially around the way you feel about your body. Many patients feel uncomfortable talking about these feelings and changes. The health care providers at the Norton Cancer Institute Sexual Health Program offer private, compassionate […]

It is normal to experience many different emotions before, during and after cancer diagnosis and treatment, especially around the way you feel about your body. Many patients feel uncomfortable talking about these feelings and changes.

The health care providers at the Norton Cancer Institute Sexual Health Program offer private, compassionate consulting. We also can help with access to accurate information and education to help you manage these changes and find answers.

We offer services to individuals and couples. The program is inclusive of all genders and sexual orientations.

Before Cancer Treatment

Sexual health is part of your overall personal wellness landscape. How you take care of your health — including your sexual health — can make a major difference in your quality of life. At Norton Cancer Institute, we support awareness, education and empowerment about your sexual health.

During Cancer Treatment

Cancer treatment such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy can cause physical and emotional changes that affect your whole life, including your sex life. You may notice changes in body image, your interest in sex or your ability to take part in sexual activity.

After Cancer Treatment

Surviving cancer does not mean you need to live with sexual side effects from cancer treatment. Sexuality is complex, and sexual function after diagnosis and treatment of cancer is even more complex. Your Norton Cancer Institute providers want to ensure that we improve the sexual quality of life of patients.

To learn more, call (502) 629-HOPE (4673) or email cancerre[email protected].

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