Healthy eating habits for the body and mind, the Mediterranean way: Dr. Nina Radcliff | Latest Headlines

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Eating the right nutrients helps to keep your body and mind healthy, fortified and functioning properly. Interestingly, research during COVID-19 underscores again that Mediterranean eating habits are a standout in benefitting heart health and boosting immunity while improving your mood and aiding in managing stress and anxiety. About the healthy […]

Eating the right nutrients helps to keep your body and mind healthy, fortified and functioning properly. Interestingly, research during COVID-19 underscores again that Mediterranean eating habits are a standout in benefitting heart health and boosting immunity while improving your mood and aiding in managing stress and anxiety.

About the healthy Mediterranean plan

So how does Mediterranean eating habits help two totally different areas of your body? The foundational reason is the Mediterranean eating is anti-inflammatory, and studies are finding that many chronic diseases are linked to chronic inflammation.

Based on the traditional cuisine of countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea, the majority of foods in a Mediterranean eating plan come from plants: whole grains, fruits, vegetables, herbs and spices, beans, nuts, seeds and olive oil.

Blending these basics of yummy, healthy eating has been shown to improve mental and physical health:

Fruits and vegetables: Loaded with antioxidants, vitamins, fiber and nutrients, while low in calories, try to include them in every meal and snacking. No single fruit or vegetable can provide all the healthy components your body needs, so incorporate a variety to get the full spectrum of benefits.

Whole grains: Wheat, oats, quinoa, barley, popcorn and rye are whole-some foods that contain little or no saturated or trans-fats but plenty of phytochemicals (disease preventive properties), antioxidants, fiber, iron, magnesium and vitamins B and E — all kinds of good stuff! In addition to tasting yummy, studies have shown that people who eat three daily servings of whole grains may be able to significantly reduce their risk of heart disease (up to 28%), stroke (up to 36%), and type 2 diabetes (up to 30%).

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