Get moving in the new year to help your body’s health, LSU nutrition agent says |

Bozz District

January is the month for new beginnings and a perfect time to begin exercising or increasing your physical activity for better health. Only 23% of the population meet the physical activity guidelines of 150 minutes a week (30 minutes a day). Make this new year a “Year of Physical Activity.” […]

January is the month for new beginnings and a perfect time to begin exercising or increasing your physical activity for better health.

Only 23% of the population meet the physical activity guidelines of 150 minutes a week (30 minutes a day). Make this new year a “Year of Physical Activity.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports it can be difficult for children and parents to get enough physical activity when they are exposed to environments that do not support healthy habits. Places such as child are centers, schools, or communities can affect activity by not providing opportunities for physical activity. Other community factors that affect physical activity include the availability of places to exercise; peer and social supports; marketing and promotion; and policies that determine how a community is designed.

The CDC’s recommended intervention to reduce obesity includes one of the major environmental and policy approaches: Increase opportunities for safe physical activity for individuals and families.

It may be overwhelming to think about what you can do to incorporate physical activity in your daily routine. It helps to focus on small, doable steps. 

Even light movement can help flush out germs from your lungs and airways, increase circulation of disease-fighting white blood cells and raise your body temperature. Physical activity is good for your heart, muscles, bones and brain functions. Movement can also boost your mood, which helps your body better handle stress.

Step into a new day by incorporating more physical activity into your day. Your body will thank you.

Resources: Center for Disease Control and Prevention, www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/index.html

Editor’s note: This was written by Karen Jones, an area nutrition agent in Jefferson Parish.

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